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Design on the Big Screen

Excitement is brewing as the 92nd Academy Awards approaches, and we cannot wait to see which are the winning titles and who will be taking the golden man home. From the worldwide controversies due to the lack of female nominees to Billie Eilish’s much-anticipated performance, the Oscars has always been and will surely be the talk of the town.

In light of this, we couldn’t help but look back at the relationship between films and graphic design.


American Psycho

Despite not being an Academy Award winner, American Psycho shot to fame in the year 2000. The film’s thrilling plot made quite an impression in general, but on a more surprising note, it changed the game on quite a surprising sector; Business Cards.

The 3-minute scene based on a discussion regarding a set of business cards made such an impression that Hoban Cards, a letterpress printing shop located in Washington, received numerous orders requesting these specific business cards, to the point where the company actually introduced an “Improved Paul Allen” as they did not only copy the original but they also updated and polished the design.

And whilst the actual business cards in the movie were shown for seconds, one must wonder what made these business cards so special? Some of it simply comes down to the novelty of their celebrity status due to the movie’s fame, but it also has to do with the flexibility of the cards’ layout.

The cards manage to display a relatively large amount of information on a single-sided card, and the layout has a professional, familiar feel to it and is well-suited in a variety of industries. The focal point is on the name, without requiring the font to be overly large or ostentatious and it’s safely nestled inside all the desired contact and business information. In short, it is adaptable, which makes these business cards so highly favoured.

Click HERE for source. 


Saul Bass

Renowned graphic designer Saul Bass is definitely not a stranger to the entertainment scene. With an envious portfolio that stretches from Title Sequences of pop-culture movies such as Psycho and Goodfellas, to Movie Posters of films like Exodus and The Shining, he has inspired and influenced succeeding generations of movie fans and designers alike. Saul Bass also delved into the film direction, with two of his personal works nominated for an Academy Award. It is this niche portfolio that Bass was known for, as he immediately grasped the link between filmmaking and design, by bringing minimalism into his creations whilst leaving the film’s cinematic essence intact.

He was also the first to realize the creative potential of the opening and closing credits of a movie, and understand the importance of opening credits, as these ultimately enhance the experience of the audience and contribute to the mood and theme of the movie within the opening moments.

Click HERE for source. 


Netflix’s Font Psychology

Movie Poster                            check

Movie Theme                           check

Movie Font                               in progress….

 Netflix’s movie and show posters are an algorithm on their own, with the poster image changing depending on the user’s show preference, i.e. if a user is more inclined to see a movie or show because there is a couple showing on the poster, then Netflix will recommend other movies and/or shows with couples showing on the poster (even if it is more horror themed than romantic), but what’s also fascinating about Netflix is that even the Font is seen to with great scrutiny and that it can easily set the theme of the movie/show, without the need of going to IMDB to check on its synopsis.

 “Fonts can have an unexpectedly physical response on us, apparently. Designer Sarah Hyndman gave a TED talk on how different fonts can influence not just our moods, but also our perception of taste and smell. For example, rounded fonts may call upon associations we have with plump, ripe fruits that are sweet to eat. Meanwhile, jagged, angular fonts can look angry or dangerous and may give us a sense of sourness and bitterness.”

 Netflix’s impressive use of font is truly an example on how font also has an effect on how products, services, etc. are perceived by the public. Whilst no individual is the same, the general idea can be grasped easily through the font, such as Love’s handwritten font in its poster gives the impression of a down-to-earth story with lovably imperfect characters.

https://venngage.com/blog/font-psychology/

Click HERE for source. 

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